Spring Dinner: 50 Years of Wildlife Science in the North Cascades

Spring Dinner: 50 Years of Wildlife Science in the North Cascades

Spring Dinner: 50 Years of Wildlife Science in the North Cascades

Event Details

When
Mar 31, 2018 03:00 PM to
Apr 01, 2018 03:00 PM
Where
North Cascades Environmental Learning Center
Instructor
Triple Accommodations
$110.00
Double Accommodations
$130.00
Cost with no Lodging
$50.00
Tuition Includes
Two meals, overnight accommodations, presentation and naturalist-led outdoor explorations
Add it to your calendar
vCal
iCal

Are you curious about the elusive wildlife roaming the North Cascades? Come learn about historical and current wildlife research and monitoring projects with Roger Christophersen, wildlife biologist at North Cascades National Park Service Complex. Roger works on the frontlines in monitoring wildlife in the park -- including wolves, bears, pikas, marmots and wolverines -- and he’s going to share with us stories, photographs and data that show how these populations are doing, their successes as well as the challenges that lie ahead. 

Spring Dinner: 50 Years of Wildlife Science in the North Cascades

Photo Icon North Cascades Conservation Council

The first event in our slate of events celebrating the 50th anniversary of the North Cascades National Park Service Complex, this weekend will feature a special dinner highlighting local foods of the Skagit Valley, Roger's exclusive presentation, overnight lodging, breakfast and a naturalist-led outdoor exploration in the Diablo Lake neighborhood.

*note: there are a very limited number of single-occupancy rooms available ($225/person) in order to make room for more guests for this special weekend. Call (360) 854-2599 to check availability.

As a bonus add-on, Roger will be leading an easy hike to a selection of his study sites and wildlife cams in the Thunder Creek watershed; register by calling (360) 854-2599.

The North Cascades Park Complex encompasses nearly 700,000 acres of stunning landscapes with varied habitats that support a wide array of wildlife species, including over 200 species of birds and 75 species of mammals. The park plays an increasingly important role in conserving species and ecological processes. Although the park is largely protected wilderness, it is not isolated from natural and anthropogenic challenges that threaten the viability of some species. Roger will address current and proposed conservation plans that will impact the wildlife of the North Cascades for the next 50 years.